Strong Athletes are Healthy Athletes

Updated: Jun 13

The definition of an athlete is very subjective and dependent on one’s favorite

sport(s), but if we were to break down the definition into the most basic form, it would be

– the ability to rapidly and effectively absorb and produce force. This definition includes

various athletes and sports: basketball, volleyball, gymnastics, weightlifting, etc.

A standard quality amongst these athletes is their ability to absorb and produce force,

represented as… strength! 

The most effective way to build strength is to progressively overload the body

with common weight room strength movements such as the squat, bench press,

deadlift, and row. Each of those exercises stimulates large muscles to build bigger in

size, which allows for greater force to be produced by each muscle. This change to the

muscles will enable athletes to cut harder, sprint faster, and maintain muscle and joint

health. 

Another critical aspect of increasing strength is the physical health of both the

muscles and the joints. To perform a given motion (kick, run, jump, etc.) requires a

precise combination of coordinated muscle contractions and relaxations. If one of these

coordinated movements is interrupted, it can increase injury risks. As stated earlier,

strength training and multi-joint exercise train the body to coordinate those movements

and causes the muscles and joints to remain strong. 


To conclude, strength training affects athletes in two ways: 

1. Increase their ability to produce and absorb force = cutting harder, sprinting

faster, jumping higher


2. Better force production = stronger and bigger muscles = better movement

coordination, all of which lead to a healthier athlete.


A strong athlete is a healthy athlete, and a healthy athlete is a productive athlete!




Written by Coach Ryan M.


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